Classes & Workshops

Since opening in 2015, The Whole Shebang has been honored to host classes and workshops with local, national, and international artists, including:

Alice Chauchat • Ann-Marie Gover • Asimina Chremos • Doran George • Eroca Nicols • Esther Baker-Tarpaga • Germaine Fraser • iele paloumpis • Jaamil Olawale Kosoko • Janna Meiring • Khaled Barghouthi • Lela Aisha Jones • Meg Foley • Michael Kiley • Nicole Bindler • Rae Diamond • Samar Haddad King • Shannon Murphy • Stina Nyberg • Theatre of the Oppressed • Zoe Rabinowitz

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The Switching - November 2019

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The Switching - November 2019

from 20.00

with Jumatatu Poe

The Switching
a workshop series with Jumatatu Poe
November 17 - 4pm-7pm, and November 18-20 - 6pm-9pm
Full workshop early bird $75-100 (until Oct 17) // full workshop after Oct 17 $100-125 // Drop in $20-35 (drop ins only allowed Sun + Mon) 

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The Switching
a workshop series with Jumatatu Poe
November 17 - 4pm-7pm, and November 18-20 - 6pm-9pm
Full workshop early bird $75-100 (until Oct 17) // full workshop after Oct 17 $100-125 // Drop in $20-35 (drop ins only allowed Sun + Mon) 

I like to imagine that this practice in performance improvisation, The Switching, is a strategy in immediate evolution, rapid-fire shifting, sublime learning of and in the moment. I began this practice while dealing with my curiosities around a question I obsessed over: “Can I change myself?” 

Our practice will deal with strategic essentialization – through the immediate re-design of ourselves into other creatures, or other ways of being our innate creatures – and working with immediately identifying the restrictions/limitations that are inescapable. It’s round about, and ideally will come full circle.

Now, in this moment, it’s circle/curve through my distals, and my distals
are everywhere, and my desire travels in orbits, in cycles, and my vision is a limb.
And now, in this moment, my vision is a limb, and I am comprised of everything
that I can sense that I cannot see, and I am composed of the same
material all throughout my body, and my voice is flat.
And now, in this moment, my voice is flat, and my rhythmic is insistently
percussive, and my organs erupt to propel me into movement, and
then they recompose themselves, and I am responsible for all of the sound I can
hear, and I am feeling overwhelmed at all of my responsibility, and my
eroticism desire is piercing through my pores.

For me, there is something deeply spiritual about it, something confusing, something humbling/humiliating about it. I feel like it has theoretical links to code switching, especially as it has to do with my Blackness and queerness, experiences of immediate compartmentalization/contextualization as a defense mechanism, as a means of survival.

BIO
I am a choreographer and performer based between Philadelphia and New York City who grew up dancing around the living room and at parties with my siblings and cousins. My early exposure to concert dance was through African dance and capoeira performances on California college campuses where my Pan-Africanist parents studied and worked, but I did not start “formal” dance training until college with Umfundalai, Kariamu Welsh’s contemporary African dance technique. My work continues to be influenced by various sources, including my foundations in those living rooms and parties, my early technical training in contemporary African dance, my continued study of contemporary dance and performance, my movement trainings with dancer and anatomist Irene Dowd around anatomy and proprioception, my sociological research of and technical training in J-sette performance with Donte Beacham. Through my artistic work, I strive to engage in and further dialogues with Black queer folks, create lovingly agitating performance work that recognizes History as only one option for the contextualization of the present, and continue to imagine options for artists’ economic and emotional sustainability.

photo credits: Tayarisha Poe